Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Moringa Documentary original in English




Herbal (plant) medicine

The Moringa Tree, with all its edible leaves, flowers, and pods are one of most power packed, nutritious trees in the world. Many cultures, like Amazonian Indian tribes, with no written languages, depended on oral communication from generation to generation, to convey information and traditions which were also rich in plant stories. Since ancient times and continuing to current days, people from all over the world have grown or collected plants for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Moringa Oleifera is one of the best examples. People have long known that botanical medicine provided a complete, safe system of healing and prevention of diseases. This is the most ancient form of healthcare known to humankind.

Botany

Moringa/Maungai is a small tree growing as high as 9 meters, with a soft and white wood and corky and gummy bark. Leaves are alternate, usually thrice pinnate, 25 to 50 centimeters long. Each compound leaf contains 3-9 very thin leaflets dispersed on a compound (3 times pinnate) stalk. The leaflets are thin, ovate to elliptic, and 1 to 2 centimeters long. Flowers are white and fragrant, 1.5 to 2 centimeters long, on spreading panicles. Pod is 15 to 30 centimeters long, pendulous, three-angled, and nine-ribbled. Seeds are three-angled, and winged on the angles.

Distribution

• Planted throughout the Philippines in settled areas at low and medium altitudes.

• Introduced from Malaya or some other part of tropical Asia in prehistoric times.

• A common backyard vegetable and a border plant.

• Now pantropic.

Propagation

• Propagation by seeds and stem cuttings.

• Mature malunggay cuttings should be 2 cm or more in diameter and not less than 80 cm (30 inches) in length. Mature cuttings are preferred as they sprout earlier and grow faster.

• The only pests known to attack malunggay are mites of the Tetranychus spp.

Parts utilized

Flowers, leaves, young pods

Properties

• Root has the taste of horseradish.

• Considered galactagogue, rubefacient, antiscorbutic, diuretic, stimulant, purgative, antibiotic, antifungal.

• Anti-inflammatory, antitumor activities on mice studies.

• Antioxidant, anti-aging, anti-ulcer.

• Estrogenic, anti-progestational, hypoglycemic, antihyperthyroidism, hypocholesterolemic, anti-hyperthyroid, antispasmodic.

• Considered abortifacient and emmenagogue.

• Purported to be beneficial for decreasing blood pressure, relieving headaches and migraines, reducing inflammatory and arthritic pains, anti-ulcer, anti-tumor. Purported to be beneficial for decreasing blood pressure, relieving headaches and migraines, reducing inflammatory and arthritic pains.
 
Constituents

• Root yields an essential oil, pungent and offensive in odor.

• Studies of MO leaves have yielded phytochemicals to which are attributed hypotensive effects and anti-cancer properties.

The root bark has sex hormone-related properties.

• Root bark contains alkaloids.

Uses

Nutritional

• Flowers, young leaves and young pods eaten as a vegetable inn the Philippines, Malaya, and India.

• In Malaya, seeds also eaten as peanuts.

• Roots are used as seasoning because of it horseradish flavor.

 • Young leaves are a rich source of calcium, iron, phosphorus and vitamins A, B and C.

 • High in HDL (high density lipoproteins); a source of amino acids, omega oils, antioxidants.

• Young fruit yield a high amount of protein and phosphorus, a fair source of calcium and iron,

• Comparative content: Gram for gram, 7 times the vitamin C in oranges, 4 times the calcium and twice the protein in milk, 4 times the vitamin A in carrots, 3 times the potassium in bananas.

 • 100 gms or 1 cup of cooked malunggay leaves contain 3.1 g protein, 0.6 g fiber, 96 mg calcium, 29 mg phosphorus, 1.7 mg iron, 2,820 mg beta-carotene, 0.07 mg thiamin, 0.14a mg riboflavin, 1.1 mg niacin, and 53 mg of vitamin C. (Dr. Lydia Marero of the Food and Drug Research Institute -FNRI)

 Folkloric

 - Decoction of leaves used for hiccups, asthma, gout, back pain, rheumatism, wounds and sores.

 - Young leaves, usually boiled, used to increase the flow of breast milk.

- Pods for intestinal parasitism.

 - Leaves and fruit used for constipation.

 - Decoction of boiled roots used to wash sores and ulcers.

 - Decoction of the bark used for excitement, restlessness.

 - In India pounded roots used as poultice for inflammatory swelling. Flowers used for catarrh, with young leaves or young pods.

 - In Nicaragua decoction of roots used for dropsy.

 - Roots have been used as abortifacient. In India, bark is used as abortifacient.

 - Decoction of root-bark used as fomentation to relieve spasms; also, for calculous affections.

 - Gum, mixed with sesamum oil, used for relief of earaches. Same, also reported as abortifacient.

 - In Java, gum used for intestinal complaints.

 - Roots chewed and applied to snake bites.

 - Decoction of roots is considered anti scorbutic; also used in delirious patients.

 - Juice of roots is used for otalgia.

 - Bark used as rubefacient remedy.

 - Decoction of roots is use as gargle for hoarseness and sore throat.

 - Leaves used as purgative.

 - Chewing of leaves used in gonorrhea to increase urine flow.

 - Fresh roots used as stimulant and diuretic.

 - Seeds for hypertension, gout, asthma, hiccups, and as a diuretic.

- Rheumatic complaints: Decoction of seeds; or, powdered roasted seeds applied to affected area.

 - Juice of the root with milk used for asthma, hiccups, gout, lumbago.

 - Poultice of leaves applied for glandular swelling.

 - Pounded fresh leaves mixed with coconut oil applied to wounds and cuts.

 - The flowers boiled with soy milk thought to have aphrodisiac quality.

 - Root is rubefacient and plaster applied externally as counter irritant.

 - In West Bengal, India, roots taken by women, for permanent contraception (Studies have shown total inactivation or suppression of the reproductive system).

Others

• Dye: In Jamaica the wood is used for dyeing blue color.

• Oil: known as Ben oil, extracted from flowers can be used as illuminant, ointment base, and absorbent in the enfleurage process of extracting volatile oils from flowers. |With ointments, the oil allows longer shelf life without undergoing oxidation.The oil, applied locally, has also been helpful for arthritic pains, rheumatic and gouty joints.

Breastfeeding women

• Malunggay leaves and pods are helpful in increasing breast milk in the breastfeeding months. One tablespoon of leaf powder provide 14% of the protein, 40% of the calcium, 23% of the iron and most of the vitamin A needs of a child aged one to three. Six tablespoons of leaf powder will provide nearly all of the woman's daily iron and calcium needs during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Studies

• Moringa preparations have been cited often in scientific literature as antibiotic, anti- inflammatory, hypocholesterolemic and hypoglycemic. However, many of the reports are not placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials.

• Anti-Inflammatory / Anti-tumor: Anti-inflammatory and Anti tumor Activities of Seeds Extracts of Malunggay—A study showed the crude ethanol extract of dried seeds inhibited the carrageenan-induced inflammation in the hind paw of mice by 85% at a dosage of 3 mg/g body weight;  the mature green seeds by 77%. The crude ethanol extract also inhibited the formation of Epstein-Barr virus-early antigen (EBV-EA) induced by 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). At a dosage of 100 ?g/ml, the extract inhibited EBV-EA formation by 100% suggesting its antitumor-promoting activity. <Abstract:http://www.stii.dost.gov.ph/pjsweb/data/anti tumor_of_malunggay.htm>

• Ovarian Cancer: Possible Role of Moringa oleifera Lam. Root in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A hormonal etiology of epithelial ovarian cancer has been long suspected. Study suggests M Oleifera can interfere with hormone receptor-related and neoplastic growth-related cytokine pathways through centrally acting mechanisms.

• Asthma: Antiasthmatic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam: A clinical study: Study showed improvement in forced vital capacity, FEV1, and peak expiratory flow rate. It suggests a usefulness for MO seed kernel in patients with asthma.

• Antibiotic: 50 years ago, a study yielded Pterygospermin, a compound that readily dissociates into two molecules of benzyl isothiocyanate which has been shown to have antimicrobial properties. Unfortunately, many of the reports of antibiotic efficacy in humans were not from placebo controlled, randomized clinical trials. Recent studies have demonstrated possible efficacy against H. pylori.

• Hormonal properties / Abortifacient: Biochemical observations and histologic findings have been correlated with the anti-implantation action of aequous extracts, one possible explanation for its use as an abortifacient. source

• Antiurolithiatic: Study showed lowering of stone forming constituents in the kidneys of calculogenic rats with the use of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of MO suggesting antiurolithiatic activity.

• Antimicrobial / Water Purifyiing: Study of MO seeds paste for water purification yielded a steroidal glycoside, strophantidin, a bioactive agent in the seed. The seed paste was found effective in clarification and sedimentation of inorganic and organic matter in raw water, reducing total microbial and coliform counts by 55% and 65% respectively, in 24 hours, compared to alum with 65% and 83% reduction.

• Antipyretic / Wound Healing: Study of the ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts of MO showed significant antipyretic activity in rats; the ethyl acetate extract of dried leaves showed significant wound healing on rat wound models.

• Analgeic: Previous studies have shown analgesic activity from the leaves of MO. This study on the alcoholic extract of MO seeds showed potent analgesic activity comparable to that of aspirin dose of 25 mg/kg BW.

• Hepatoprotective / Antioxidant: Study concluded that the alcoholic extracts of MO produced significant hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity, the aqueous extracts of the fruit less than the alcoholic extract.

• Anti-Ulcer: Study of M oleifera extract showed ulcer by protection by modulating 5-HT secretion through EC dell via 5-HT3 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract.

• Anthelmintic: In a comparative study of the anthelmintic activity of M oleifera and V negundo against Indian earthworm Pheritima posthuma, dose-dependent activity was observed with M oleifera showing more activity than V negundo.

• Comparison with Atenolol: Study comparing the effects of M oleifera with atenolol in adrenaline-induced rats on serum cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose level, heart and body weight showed the M oleifera leave extract made significant changes in each cardiovascular parameter.

• Hepatoprotective: Study in acetaminophen-induced liver disease in mice showed that leaves of MO can prevent hepatic injuries by preventing the decline of glutathione level.

• Antioxidant / Hypolipidemic / Anti-Atherosclerotic: Study showed lowering of cholesterol levels and reduction of the atherosclerotic plaque formation. Results indicate MO possesses antioxidant, hypolipidemic and antiatherosclerotic activities and has therapeutic potential for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

• Chemomodulatory / Chemopreventive: Study showed the possible chemopreventive potential of Moringal oleifera against chemical carcinogenesis.

• Anti-Diabetic: Study of the aqueous extract of MO leaves in STZ-induced sub, mild, and severely diabetic rats produced lowering of blood glucose levels, significant reduction in urine sugar and urine protein levels. Study validates scientifically claims on MO as ethnomedicine in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

 In the news

• In Leyte, extracted malunggay juice is mixed with lemonsito juice to make ice candies or cold drinks, making it more plalatble and agreeable to children who detest vegetables.

 Because of its high vitamin A, C, and E content, all potent antioxidants, malunggay is a very effective in removing unstable free radicals that is damaging to molecules and pro-aging.

For the men: The fruit could increase the sperm count !

For increasing breast milk: One rounded tablespoon of leaf powder provides 14% of protein requirements, 40% of calcium, 23% of iron, and the daily vitamin A needs of a child aged one to three. Six rounded tablespoons of leaf powder will provide the woman's daily iron and calcium needs during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

 Recent uses and preparation:

Constipation: Eat one or two cups of the cooked leaves at supper time, with plenty of water.

 Wound wash: Apply crushed leaves directly to the wound, maintaining cleanliness duriing the process.

• Biofuel source

• Moringa oil extracted from the seed of the malunggay plant is now being tapped as source of biodiesel. It is gaining preferable status over Jatropha as a source of biofuel. All parts of the malunggay plant are used whereas Jatropha is left with poisonous waste after oil extraction. Also, malunggay needs only one to two years for seedling maturation compared to Jatropha's three to five years. The math of malunggay's commercial potential is attractive: Seeds are bought at P10 per kilo, and a hectare of malunggay seedlings can harvest 20,000 kilos in 2 years with a potential profit of P200,000. (Philippine Star)

Toxicities

ª Root bark contains 2 alkaloids, as well as the toxic hypotensive moringinine.

ª Has dose-dependent negative inotropic effect, in isolated frog heart study.

• Niazinin A, niazimicin and niaziminin A and B isolated from the ethanol extract produced hypotensive, bradycardic and negative inotropic effects in experimental animals.

• The bark may cause violent uterine contractions that can be fatal. Chronic high-dose use may cause liver and kidney dysfunctions.

• In frequent or large doses, Interior flesh of the plant can cause toxic nerve paralysis from the alkaloid spirochin. source

Superstitions

Malunggay ingestion is avoided in the immediate period after a family member's death. In the superstitions-laden isms of rural Tagalog life, as a malunggay branch or twig will shed off all its leaves within a few hours of being snapped off a tree, ingesting malunggay might bring death to a relative. Avoiding its use is strongly advised during the ritual of nine days of prayers after a death.

Availability

Wild-crafted. Garden and back-yard cultivation, Commercial production of oil extracted from flowers.

 Malunggay capsule (Natalac) - containing 250 mg dried young malunggay leaves, one to two capsules daily.

 
OTHER IMAGE SOURCE / Public Domain / File:Moringa oleifera Blanco1.125.png / Flora de Filipinas / Francisco Manuel Blanco (OSA), 1880-1883 / Modifications by Carol Spears / Wikipedia OTHER IMAGE SOURCE / Close-up Flower / File:Moringa Oleifera.jpg / Muhammad Mahdi Karim / 21 October 2007 / GNU Free Documentation License / Creative Commons Attribution / Wikipedia

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings


(1)

Possible Role of Moringa oleifera Lam. Root in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer / Chinmoy K Bose MD / Medscape General Medicine / Published online 2007 February 6.

 (2)

 Anti-inflammtory and Antitumor Activities of Seeds Extracts of Malunggay

(3)

 Antiasthmatic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam: A clinical study

 (4)

Moringa oleifera: A Review of the Medical Evidence for Its Nutritional, Therapeutic, and Prophylactic Properties. Part 1. / Trees For Life Journal / TFLJournal.org / Jed W Fahey, Sc.D. / Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Dept of Pharma and Molecular Sciences.

(5)

Possible Role of Moringa oleifera Lam. Root in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer / Chinmoy K. Bose, MD, PhD, / MedGenMed. 2007; 9(1): 26. Published online 2007 February 6 /

(6)

Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. root-wood on ethylene glycol induced urolithiasis in rats / doi:10.1016/j.jep.2005.11.004 / Journal of Ethnopharmacology Vol 105, Issues 1-2, 21 April 2006, Pages 306-311

(7)

Studies on Traditional Water Purification Using MO seeds / African Study Monographs, 15(3):135-142, Nov 1994

 (8)

Antipyretic and wound healing activities of moringa oleifera lam. in rats / Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences / 2006 | Vol 68 | Issue : 1 | Page : 124-126

 (9)

Analgesic activity of seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam./ 2008 | Vol 2, Issue : 2 , pg108-110 / DOI: 10.4103/0973-8258.41182

(10)

Hepatoprotective Activity of Moringa oleifera Lam. Fruit on Isolated Rat Hepatocytes / PHCOG MAG.: Research Article/ Vol 4, Issue 15 (Suppl), Jul-Sep, 2008

 (11)

Malunggay—Recent uses / Philippine Inquirer. Monica Feria. Oct 6, 2007

(12)

Malunggay oil as biofuel / Philippine Star. Helen Flores. April 11, 2008

 (13)

 Malunggay's Medicinal Magic / Ernesto Ordoñez / Philippine Daily Inquirer. October 12, 2007

(14)

Comparative Studies on Anthelmintic Activity of Moringa Oleifera and VitexNegundo / Trapti Rastogi et al / Asian J. Research Chem. 2(2): April.-June, 2009

 (15)

Nutritional evaluation of Moringa Oleifera leaves and extract / Abd Elmoneim Osman Elkhalifa et al / Ahfad Journal, Dec, 2007

 (16)

 Useful Plants of the Philippines, Vol 1. A Scientific Guide to Modern Botanical Medicine / Rummel D J /2005

 (17)

Comparison of Moringa oleifera Leaves Extract with Atenolol on Serum triglyceride, Serum Cholesterol, Blood glucose, heart weight, body weight in Adrenaline Induced Rats / Naznin Ara et al / Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences 15 (2) 253-258 December, 2008

 (18)

Moringa oleifera induced potentiation of serotonin release by 5-HT(3) receptors in experimental ulcer model / Debnath S, Biswas d, Ray K, Guha D / Phytomedicine. 2011 Jan 15;18(2-3):91-5. Epub 2010 Jul 16.

Moringa oleifera Lam prevents acetaminophen induced liver injury through restoration of glutathione level /

Fakurazi S, Hairuszah I, Nanthini U / Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Aug;46(8):2611-5. Epub 2008 Apr 25.

 (19)

The in vitro and ex vivo antioxidant properties, hypolipidaemic and antiatherosclerotic activities of water extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves / Chumark P, Khunawat P, Sanvarinda Y, Phornchirasilp et al / J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Mar 28;116(3):439-46. Epub 2007 Dec 23.

 (20)

Chemomodulatory effect of Moringa oleifera, Lam, on hepatic carcinogen metabolising enzymes, antioxidant parameters and skin papillomagenesis in mice / Bharali R, Tabassum J, Azad MR / Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2003 Apr-Jun;4(2):131-9.

 (21)

Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats / Jaiswal D, Kumar Rai P, Kumar A, Mehta S, Watal G / J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jun 25;123(3):392-6. Epub 2009 Apr 5.
 
DISCLAIMER: The above statements are not from the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure or prevent any disease. We recommend that you consult with a physician from the American Medical Association especially when using prescribed medications or treatments. This notice is required by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

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MIRACLE WILD HERBS- Dandelion

MIRACLE WILD HERBS - DANDELION

While many people think of the dandelion as a weed, herbalists know it as valuable herb that can be used as a food and medicine.

 
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Hundreds of species of dandelion grow in Europe, Asia, and North America. Dandelion is a perennial that can grow to a height of nearly 12 inches. Dandelions have deeply notched, toothy, spatula-like leaves that are shiny and hairless. Dandelion stems are capped by bright yellow flowers. The grooved leaves funnel rain to the root.

Dandelion flowers open with the sun in the morning and close in the evening or during gloomy weather. The dark brown roots are fleshy and brittle and are filled with a white milky substance that is bitter and pungent.

Dandelion is a rich source of vitamins A, B complex, C, and D, as well as minerals such as iron, potassium, and zinc. Dandelion leaves are used to add flavor to salads, sandwiches, and teas. The roots are used in some coffee substitutes, and the flowers are used to make wines.

Parts Used:

Dandelion leaves act as a diuretic, increasing the amount of urine the body produces. The leaves are used to stimulate the appetite and help digestion.

Dandelion flowers have antioxidant properties. Dandelions may also help improve the immune system.

Traditionally, dandelion roots and leaves were used to treat liver problems. Native Americans also boiled dandelion in water and took it to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and upset stomach.

In traditional Chinese medicine, dandelion has been used to treat stomach problems, appendicitis, and breast problems, such as inflammation or lack of milk flow.

In Europe, it was used in remedies for fever, boils, eye problems, diabetes, and diarrhea.

Today, the roots are mainly used as an appetite stimulant, and for liver and gallbladder problems. Dandelion leaves are used as a diuretic to help the body get rid of excess fluid.

Herbalists use dandelion root to detoxify the liver and gallbladder, and dandelion leaves to support kidney function.

Medicinal Uses and Indications:

Traditionally, dandelion has been used a diuretic, to increase the amount of urine the body produces in order to get rid of excess fluid. It has been used for many conditions where a diuretic might help, such as liver problems and high blood pressure. However, there is no good research on using dandelion as a diuretic in people.

Fresh or dried dandelion herb is also used as a mild appetite stimulant and to improve upset stomach. The root of the dandelion plant may act as a mild laxative and has been used to improve digestion. There is some very preliminary research that suggests dandelion may help improve liver and gallbladder function, but the study was not well designed.

Some preliminary animal studies also suggest that dandelion may help normalize blood sugar levels and lower total cholesterol and triglycerides while raising HDL, "good," cholesterol in diabetic mice. But not all the animal studies have found a positive effect on blood sugar. Human studies are needed to see if dandelion would work in people.

A few animal studies also suggest that dandelion might help fight inflammation.

Available Forms:


Dandelion herbs and roots are available fresh or dried in a variety of forms, including tinctures, liquid extract, teas, tablets, and capsules. Dandelion can be found alone or combined with other dietary supplements.

How to Take It:

Ask your doctor before giving dandelion supplements to a child, so your doctor can help you determine the dose. Eating dandelion in food is safe for a child.

Ask your doctor to help you determine the right dose for you. Some traditional doses include:

•Dried leaf infusion: 1 - 2 teaspoonfuls, 3 times daily. Pour hot water onto dried leaf and steep for 5 - 10 minutes. Drink as directed.

•Dried root decoction: 1/2 - 2 teaspoonfuls, 3 times daily. Place root into boiling water for 5 - 10 minutes. Strain and drink as directed.

•Leaf tincture (1:5) in 30% alcohol: 30 - 60 drops, 3 times daily

•Standardized powdered extract (4:1) leaf: 500 mg, 1 - 3 times daily

•Standardized powdered extract (4:1) root: 500 mg, 1 - 3 times daily

•Root tincture (1:2) fresh root in 45% alcohol: 30 - 60 drops, 3 times daily

Precautions:

For these reasons, you should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a health care provider. The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, contain components that can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications.

Dandelion is generally considered safe. Some people may develop an allergic reaction from touching dandelion, and others may develop mouth sores.

If you are allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigold, chamomile, yarrow, daisies, or iodine, you should avoid dandelion.

In some people, dandelion can cause increased stomach acid and heartburn. It may also irritate the skin if applied topically.

People with kidney problems, gallbladder problems, or gallstones should ask their health care provider before eating dandelion.

Possible Interactions:


Dandelion leaf may act as a diuretic, which can speed up how fast drugs leave your system. If you are taking prescription medications, ask your health care provider before taking dandelion leaf. If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use dandelion without first talking to your health care provider:

Antacids -- Dandelion may increase the amount of stomach acid, so antacids may not work as well.

Blood-thinning medications -- Theoretically, dandelion is a blood thinner, so it may increase the risk of bleeding, especially if you already take blood-thinners such as aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), or clopidogrel (Plavix).

Diuretics (water pills) -- Dandelion may act as a diuretic, increasing the amount of urine to help your body get rid of excess fluid. If you also take prescription diuretics or other herbs that act as diuretic, you could be at risk for an electrolyte imbalance.

Lithium -- Animal studies suggest that dandelion may make the side effects of lithium worse. Lithium is used to treat bipolar disorder.

Ciproflaxin (Cipro) -- One species of dandelion, Taraxacum mongolicum, also called Chinese dandelion, may lower the absorption of the antibiotic ciproflaxin from the digestive tract. Researchers don' t know whether the common dandelion would do the same thing.

Medications for diabetes -- Theoretically, dandelion may lower blood sugar levels. If you take medications for diabetes, taking dandelion may increase the risk of low blood sugar.

 Alternative Names:

Lion's tooth; Priest's crown; Swine's snout; Taraxacum officinale

•Reviewed last on: 1/2/2011

•Steven D. Ehrlich, NMD, Solutions Acupuncture, a private practice specializing in complementary and alternative medicine, Phoenix, AZ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

Supporting Research

Auerbach: Wilderness Medicine.5th ed. New York, NY: Mosby; 2007.

Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2002:78-83.

Cho SY,Park JY, Park EM, et al. Alternation of hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid profile in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by supplementation of dandelion water extract. Clin Chim Acta. 2002;317(1-2):109-117.

Clare BA, Conroy RS, Spelman K. The diuretic effect in human subjects of an extract of Taraxacum officinale folium over a single day. J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Aug;15(8):929-34.

Davies MG, Kersey PJ. Contact allergy to yarrow and dandelion. Contact Dermatitis. 1986;14 (ISS 4):256-7.

Hu C, Kitts DD. Antioxidant, prooxidant, and cytotoxic activities of solvent-fractionated dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower extracts in vitro. J Agric Food Chem. 2003;51(1):301-10.

Hudec J, et al. Antioxidant capacity changes and phenolic profile of Echinacea purpea, nettle (Urtica dioica L.), and dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) after application of polyamine and phenolic biosynthesis regulators. J Agric Food Chem. 2007;55(14):5689-96.

Jeon HJ, Kang HJ, Jung HJ, Kang YS, Lim CJ, Kim YM, Park EH. Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale. J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Jan 4;115(1):82-8.

Kim HM, Shin HY, Lim KH, el al., Taraxacum officinale inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from rat astrocytes. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 2000;22(3):519-30.

Kisiel W, Barszcz B. Further sesquiterpenoids and phenolics from Taraxacum officinale. Fitoterapia. 2000;71(3):269-73.

LaValle JB, Krinsky DL, Hawkins EB, et al. Natural Therapeutics Pocket Guide. Hudson, OH:LexiComp; 2000: 420-421.

Mascolo N, et al. Biological screening of Italian medicinal plants for anti-inflammatory activity. Phytotherapy Res. 1987:28-29.

Miller L. Herbal Medicinals: Selected Clinical Considerations Focusing on Known or Potential Drug-Herb Interactions. Arch Intern Med. 1998;158:2200-2211.

Petlevski R, Hadzija M, Slijepcevic M, Juretic D. Effect of 'antidiabetis' herbal preparation on serum glucose and fructosamine in NOD mice. J Ethnopharmacol. 2001;75(2-3):181-184.

Schutz K, Carle R, Schieber A. Taraxacum--a review on its phytochemical and pharmacological profile. J Ethnopharmacol. 2006;107(3):313-23.

Sigstedt SC, Hooten CJ, Callewaert MC, Jenkins AR, et al. Evaluation of aqueous extracts of Taraxacum officinale on growth and invasion of breast and prostate cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 2008 May;32(5):1085-90.

Swanston-Flatt SK, Day C, Flatt PR, Gould BJ, Bailey CJ. Glycaemic effects of traditional European plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice. Diabetes Res. 1989;10(2):69-73.
 
Sweeney B, Vora M, Ulbricht C, Basch E. Evidence-based systematic review of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. J Herb Pharmacother. 2005;5(1):79-93.

 Trojanova I, Rada V, Kokoska L, Vlkova E. The bifidogenic effect of Taraxacum officinale root. Fitoterapia. 2004;75(7-8):760-3.

Zhi X, Honda K, Ozaki K, Misugi T, Sumi T, Ishiko O. Dandelion T-1 extract up-regulates reproductive hormone receptor expression

DISCLAIMER: The above statements are not from the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure or prevent any disease. We recommend that you consult with a physician from the American Medical Association especially when using prescribed medications or treatments. This notice is required by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

Amen Par Ankh (Sacred House of Life) and Amen Ankh Farm; is a spiritual center to become balanced physically, emotionally and spiritually and to Realize your fullest capacities of life, health, prosperity and strength. We provide Life Coaching, gentle yoga, classes, Energy work Courses, Gifts, and Accessories, Cultural Ceremonies, Workshops and special Events.
Contact Us and become a member as We Celebrate the Cycles of Life!
Email: amen.parankh@gmail.com , Call: 816-304-7240 sign-up for courses and support: http://www.gofundme.com/amen-urban-farm , information: http://emwot.ws/Amen_ParAnkh , http://amen-parankh.blogspot.com/ ,
Amen Par Ankh is a place of peace and healing through connection with nature and the cycles of life.
Here we can truly come together and create and build something to share together. It is our intention that this spiritual center becomes a sacred space for personal discovery with quiet reflection and time for internal work, but is also an active space for expressions of our life. Dua (Thank you!) ♥.
We offer: Ceremony, Counseling, Coaching, Cleansings, & Classes

Friday, May 3, 2013

AMEN ANKH URBAN FARM


Urban Farming-- "The first step to free ourselves is to feed ourselves!!!" Production, Promotion, and Perpetuation- Teach a Girl- Heal a Nation!
Mission

"The first step to free ourselves is to feed ourselves!!!"

To establish Asar's Mandate: Global production, promotion, and perpetuation of food and resources- The Mission of Amen Ankh Farm is to grow, Produce, prepare and sell local healthy Foods in environmentally, respected, earth gentle ways-  to restore balance in our relationship with the cosmos, earth and our communities and to increase awareness of nourishment, environment and health. By honoring the traditional teachings of our Indigenous relatives, we restore respect for the blessings of food, soil, water, sun and air that we must have to ensure a healthy life for our seeds (the next generation.)
Amen Ankh Farms is an urban agricultural enterprise with the goal of achieving environmental justice and sustainability by “improving neighborhood access to healthy food.
Amen Ankh Farm grows produce affordable to the local economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods, and promotes the development of healthy-eating attitudes and behaviors through outreach programs. The farm also aims at increasing Kansas City students’ nutritional knowledge and awareness of food systems and environmental sustainability through hands-on educational programs. By localizing consumption and following environmentally sustainable farming practices,
Amen Ankh Farm aspires to protect the environment and to improve the watershed.

The farm’s markets include residents in the adjacent five neighborhoods and Kansas City's Community Organizations, Religious and educational institutes, restaurants and institutions.

Amen Ankh Urban Farm Seeks to live in a sustainable ecosystem with this planet.
To educate our own children to be leaders in/for a way of life.

"Our bodies are the temple of our soul, mind & spirit. 


Like any “spacesuit” we must care and maintain this body for our existence on this planet."


Know Thyself!
Live on Purpose!
As Above, So below…
As within, So Without!
Nuk Puk Nuk!


Company Overview
Owned by our Urban Farmer Youth, Managed by Sasteh Meter Mosley, and Nuta Beqsu AmenRa- We grow, prepare and sell local healthy Indigenous Foods in environmentally, respectful, earth gentle ways to restore balance in our relationship with the cosmos, earth and our communities and by increasing awareness of nourishment, environment and health. By honoring the traditional teachings of our Indigenous relatives we restore respect for the blessings of food, soil, water, and air that we must have to ensure a healthy life for our seeds (the next generation.)
Amen Ankh Farms is an urban agricultural enterprise with the goal of achieving environmental justice and sustainability by
“improving neighborhood access to healthy food.
Using Local indigenous Herbs, Fruits and plant life (Three Sisters: Corn, Beans, and Squash) and cruciferous vegetables, Cabbage, Kale, Arugula and Chard With Wheat Grass and other Sprouts, Herbs: Basil, Sage, Chives, Rosemary, Parsley, Peppers and other nutritional drink supplements -Baked Goods, cosmetics, liniments. Healing and Sovereignty: Through the inspiration of Kujichagulia (Self determination) All people of Kemetic/ Afrikan decent must bridge the chasm of the destruction caused by global MAAFA.

PLEASE PASS THE WORD AND SUPPORT OUR NEW BLACK WOMAN OWNED BUSINESS.


Amen Par Ankh (Sacred House of Life) and Amen Ankh Urban Farm; is a local Urban Farm nestled around a Spiritual Center in the heart of midtown Kansas City, Missouri. Contact Us and become a member as We Celebrate the Cycles of Life!Email: amen.parankh@gmail.com , amen.ankh@live.com Call: 816-839-7945 sign-up for courses and support and information: http://emwot.ws/Amen_ParAnkh , http://amen-parankh.blogspot.com , Look for us on FaceBook , Twitter. We celebrate the Cycles of Life, Wellness and Balance in our everyday existence on earth. We assist in Wellness for Physical Fitness, Mental Health, and Spiritual Attainment - to realize the fullest capacities of life, health, prosperity and strength. We provide Whole Life Coaching, Energy work, A Par Ankh Reading Room, Org-Ankh Electric food Boxes, an Herbal Tea House; Juice bar, Outdoor Experiences, classes such as Cultural Head-wrapping, Natural Hair Braiding, beading and Lox twisting, ASCAC (The Association for the Study of Classical African Civilization), Art Healing Mandalas, Jewelry Making, Gentle Yoga, Canning and preserving food, Health and Wellness Study Courses, Gifts, Accessories, Cultural Ceremonies, Workshops and special events. Amen Par Ankh means sacred House of Life. Ceremony, Counseling, Coaching, Cleansings, & Classes Amen Ankh Urban Farm is an urban agricultural enterprise with the goal of achieving environmental justice and sustainability by Healthy local food production and improving local neighborhood access to healthy Foods. We run Aquaponic Systems of farm raised fish, Herbs and micro-greens. We sell Org-Ankh Electric Food Boxes! We also provide Farm-a-See tours of successful Local Farmers.We grow selected local indigenous Herbs, Fruits, Vegetable and plant life of the Three Sisters: Corn, Beans, and Squash and cruciferous vegetables: Cabbage, and Kale, With Wheat Grass and other Sprouts, Herbs: Basil, Sage, Chives, Rosemary, Parsley, Peppers and Moringa nutritional drink supplements, -From our foods we produce Baked Goods, cosmetics, & liniments to provide Healing and Sovereignty: Through the inspiration of Kujichagulia (Self determination) All Original people. Dua (Th-ankh you!) ♥.